The TASERs Are Coming, the TASERs Are Coming—Conducted Electrical Weapons: Tools to Manage and Prevent ED Violence?

Published:January 27, 2014DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jen.2013.12.014
      During the past few years, awareness regarding the frequency of workplace violence has “come out of the closet.” This “outing” has served as a catalyst for research that has explored various attributes of workplace violence, including ED nurses’ perceptions that these types of events are “just a part of the job.”
      • Rintoul Y
      • Wynaden D
      • McGowan S
      Managing aggression in the emergency department: promoting an interdisciplinary approach.
      These perceptions, along with data indicating that emergency departments are more prone to violence compared with other hospital areas, has served as a catalyst to identify evidence-based strategies to de-escalate and promote workplace safety.
      • Gillespie GL
      • Gates DM
      • Mentzel T
      An educational program to prevent, manage, and recover from workplace violence.
      • Hahn S
      • Hantikainen V
      • Needham I
      • Kok G
      • Dassen T
      • Halfens RJ
      Patient and visitor violence in the general hospital, occurrence, staff interventions and consequences: a cross-sectional survey.
      • Kowalenko T
      • Gates D
      • Gillespie GL
      • Succop P
      • Mentzel TK
      Prospective study of violence against ED workers.
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      References

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        • Wynaden D
        • McGowan S
        Managing aggression in the emergency department: promoting an interdisciplinary approach.
        Int Emerg Nurse. 2009; 17: 122-127
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        An educational program to prevent, manage, and recover from workplace violence.
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        Patient and visitor violence in the general hospital, occurrence, staff interventions and consequences: a cross-sectional survey.
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        Prospective study of violence against ED workers.
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      Biography

      Cindy Lefton is Vice President, Organizational Consulting, Psychological Associates, St Louis, MO; and Clinical Education Specialist, Trauma and Acute Care Emergency Surgery, Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St Louis, MO.

      Linked Article

      • Health Effects of TASER™ Electronic Control Devices
        Journal of Emergency NursingVol. 40Issue 5
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          I read with interest the article in the Journal of Emergency Nursing by Dr Lefton1 on the introduction of TASER™ electronic control devices (TASER International, Scottsdale, AZ) into emergency departments. Emergency departments are at times flashpoints where tensions are high, often fueled by alcohol and other recreational drugs. TASER™ electronic control devices have been promoted as a safe alternative to the use of firearms and generally as a “less lethal” response option for police,2 and it is understandable that managers would consider interventions that offer to reduce violence and injuries to patients and staff.
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