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It's Time to Provide Evidence-Based Care to Individuals with Sickle Cell Disease: A Call to Action

      In the current issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing, Linton et al
      • Linton E
      • Sourffront K
      • Gordon L
      • Genes N
      • Glassberg J
      System level informatics to improve triage practices for sickle cell disease vaso-occlusive crisis: a cluster randomized controlled trial.
      report on their successful implementation of a clinical support tool (a banner to recommend emergency severity index [ESI] triage level 2) to improve the care of sickle cell disease (SCD) for individuals presenting to the emergency department with severe pain referred to as vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC). The researchers and clinical team are to be commended. The correct assignment of a high priority triage level is evidence-based and important to facilitate rapid placement in a treatment area to expedite pain management. Individuals with SCD experience sudden onset of excruciating pain that they often describe as feeling as though their bones are breaking. Historically, pain management for these individuals has been frustrating for patients and ED providers. Evidence-based management of SCD is a priority for the Emergency Nurses Association (ENA). The work by Linton et al
      • Linton E
      • Sourffront K
      • Gordon L
      • Genes N
      • Glassberg J
      System level informatics to improve triage practices for sickle cell disease vaso-occlusive crisis: a cluster randomized controlled trial.
      is in alignment with ENA's priorities that were reflected in 2019 at the General Assembly with the passage of resolution GA-19-09 (passed with 87.6% of the 653 delegates).

      U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Evidence-based management of sickle cell disease: expert panel report, 2014. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Published September 2014. Accessed July 16, 2021.https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/evidence-based-management-sickle-cell-disease

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      Biography

      Paula Tanabe, Member, North Carolina, is a Vice Dean for Research; and Laurel B. Chadwick Distinguished Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, Duke University, Durham, NC.